A Rose (Rosa Banksiae) and a Tip for a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle

Rosa Banksiae

Class: Rose Species

Syns:   R. banksiana, Banksian rose, Banks’ Rose, Lady Banks’

Cultivated since 1796

 

Rosa banksiae is one of the best shrubs for a wall and in a few years will reach the top of most houses. It produces an abundance of pretty small roses with the sweetest fragrance you can imagine. The flowers are borne on last year’s wood and so it is well-advised not to prune in the spring. Only dead or useless branches have to be trimmed. The date of introduction is not known but the double white form was first described in the Botanical Magazine for 1818 as Lady Banks’ Rose and one of the sweetest of roses. It has also been known as a native of China and had been introduced in 1807 by William Kerr. The double yellow was introduced in 1824.

 

Definitely not for the small property, this vigorous species rose offers a spectacular spring show in warm-climate gardens that can accommodate its rampant growth habit. There are four different forms of R. banksiae, varying by flower color and flower form.

·        R. banksiae normalis is considered to be the “wild” form, with single white flowers.

·        R. banksiae banksiae (also known as ‘Banksiae Alba’, R. banksiae alba, R.banksiae alba-plena, White Banksia, or White Lady Banks’ Rose) offers exceptionally fragrant, double white flowers.

·        R. banksiae lutea (R. banksiae lutea-plena, Yellow Lady Banks’ Rose) is the most well-known form of Rosa banksiae in cultivation with small, fully double, bright yellow flowers that come in clusters. They are only slightly fragrant.

·        R. Banksiae lutescens has single light yellow blooms.

 

All four have small, oval buds that open to clustered, 1-inch wide, rosette-form flowers, usually blooming in early or midspring to late spring. Slender, thornless canes carry semi-evergreen to evergreen, shiny, dark green leaves with narrow leaflets. They are rarely bothered by diseases.

 

All four forms of this specie rose have a vigorous, rambling habit and can grow up to 30 ft, so they’re usually used as 20 to 30-foot climbers. They need a sturdy support, such as a well-built pergola or arbor; they also like to scramble into trees. It is a great rose for zone 8 to 10.

 

I saw Rosa banksiae in Charleston, SC on my first visit there in 1989. We went on a House and Garden Tour and at one of the gardens we visited, ‘Yellow Lady Banks’ was growing almost to the roof of the house against the wall. We wandered along some tiny street and I saw ‘Yellow Lady Banks’ rose by the gate and I took the above photo. Fast forward to 2011 – when I joined the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, I discovered the owner of that rose is one of our members.

 

Tip of the Day – Learn to be cheerful even if you don’t feel like it.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda

 

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Cupid, Red Rose and Valentine

 

This month as we celebrate Valentine’s Day, it is interesting to note that the rose is not only a symbol of love but a symbol of discretion. Legend has it that Cupid gave a red rose to Harpocrates, the god of silence, to bribe him to secrecy over the dalliance of Venus and so the red rose become the symbol of discretion, love, passion and romance. Roses were henceforth painted on the ceilings of banquet halls to remind all gathered there that whatever was said there, should not be repeated which became the expression sub rosa (under the rose).

Subrosa 3

 

Another legend says that while Aphrodite was running to the dying Adonis, she was scratched by a rose bush and her blood falling on the roses turn it red. Other account says that Adonis turned his blood into red roses.

 

Whatever legend strikes your fancy, there is nothing in our garden at this time of the year but the florist and even the supermarket stores are selling roses grown in South America so there is no excuse not to give red roses for Valentine’s Day.

 

And how did Valentine’s Day get started?

 

A certain Bishop Valentine started it to replace the Roman festival of Lupercalia. There were several Bishops of Valentine but nobody is really certain as to who is the real Bishop Valentine. But whoever he is, the tradition continues and we celebrate this day exchanging gifts and greetings between our loved ones, friends, family but mostly lovers.

 

During the Victorian era, valentine cards were mostly decorated with old-fashioned roses. Even today, valentines are still associated with roses. For Valentine’s Day, red roses are arbitrarily the most popular flower.

Valentine Card

 

There are several red roses in the market nowadays but I can recommend some tried and true varieties that grow very well in the garden. Plant some of them and give your Valentine red roses again in June.

 

Here are my favorites:

Firefighter – dark red rose

Ingrid Bergman – dark red rose

Lasting Love – dark red rose

Let Freedom Ring – medium red rose

Mister Lincoln – dark red rose

Olympiad – medium red rose

Veterans’ Honor – dark red rose

 

 

IMG_0875
A bouquet of red roses from my garden last growing season.

 

For the romantic at heart, here is a lovely poem by Robert Burns (1759-1796).

O my Luve is like a red, red rose
   That’s newly sprung in June;
O my Luve is like the melody
   That’s sweetly played in tune.
 
So fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
   So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
   Till a’ the seas gang dry.
 
Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,
   And the rocks melt wi’ the sun;
I will love thee still, my dear,
   While the sands o’ life shall run.
 
And fare thee weel, my only luve!
   And fare thee weel awhile!
And I will come again, my luve,
   Though it were ten thousand mile.

 

Happy Valentine’s Day Everyone!!!

Single Rose

Until next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda

 

Food for Thought – Oct. 31, 2015

DAILY TIPS FOR

A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SUCCESSFUL LIFE

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Rose – Cinco de Mayo

Oct. 31, 2015

Acquire things the old-fashioned way. Save for them and pay cash.

By Rosalinda R Morgan. a.k.a. The Rose Lady

Author:

The Iron Butterfly

BAHALA NA (Come What May)

www.rosalindasgarden.com

www.rosalindarmorgan.wordpress.com

www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan

www.rosegardeningworld.wordpress.com

Food for Thought – Oct. 30, 2015

DAILY TIPS FOR

A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SUCCESSFUL LIFE

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Rose – Scentimental

Oct. 30, 2015

Find your niche and work on it.

By Rosalinda R Morgan. a.k.a. The Rose Lady

Author:

The Iron Butterfly

BAHALA NA (Come What May)

www.rosalindasgarden.com

www.rosalindarmorgan.wordpress.com

www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan

www.rosegardeningworld.wordpress.com

Food for Thought – Oct. 29, 2015

DAILY TIPS FOR

A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SUCCESSFUL LIFE

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Rose – Dublin Bay

Oct. 29, 2015

Dream big. Anything can happen.

By Rosalinda R Morgan. a.k.a. The Rose Lady

Author:

The Iron Butterfly

BAHALA NA (Come What May)

www.rosalindasgarden.com

www.rosalindarmorgan.wordpress.com

www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan

www.rosegardeningworld.wordpress.com

Food for Thought – Oct. 28, 2015

DAILY TIPS FOR

A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SUCCESSFUL LIFE

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Rose – Jubilee Celebration

Oct. 28, 2015

Turn your passions and interests into a career.

By Rosalinda R Morgan. a.k.a. The Rose Lady

Author:

The Iron Butterfly

BAHALA NA (Come What May)

www.rosalindasgarden.com

www.rosalindarmorgan.wordpress.com

www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan

www.rosegardeningworld.wordpress.com

Food for Thought – Oct. 27, 2015

DAILY TIPS FOR

A HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SUCCESSFUL LIFE

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Rose – Hot Princess

Oct. 27, 2015

Protect your credit rating. Check it out every so often to make sure it is in the best possible shape.

By Rosalinda R Morgan. a.k.a. The Rose Lady

Author:

The Iron Butterfly

BAHALA NA (Come What May)

www.rosalindasgarden.com

www.rosalindarmorgan.wordpress.com

www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan

www.rosegardeningworld.wordpress.com