Have you ever grown potatoes?

I like gardening but for an occasional tomato, I never planted any other vegetables or root crops. I’m a flower gardener and I love all kinds of flowers but my favorites are roses. Lately, I’m venturing into new territory. I love learning something new. I’ve been experimenting with container plants. I love “Marguerite”, the sweet potato vine for a spiller in containers.

Last month, I had two baking potatoes that I kept on forgetting to cook and they were getting soft. My son told me that they were getting bad and should be thrown out. I said, “No. I’ll plant them.” I thought I could use them in containers like the sweet potato vine. I thought it has the same growing habit that sweet potato vine has. I could not be more wrong. However, I didn’t have the time to plant them for days. I kept on postponing to do it and then I saw green tiny leaves sprouting from the eyes of the potato. I guessed it was time to do something.

I finally planted them in a shallow container, half in and half out of the soil which had a sedum on it. It was the only container available at the time. Surprisingly, the leaves grew and it really started taking off. It started to grow straight up. It did not look like the sweet potato vine where the leaves start spilling out of the container.  I watched it and watered it everyday.

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It started to have tiny flowers.

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I decided to transfer them in bigger pots. I pulled them out of the shallow pot and I saw a small potato among the roots. “A real potato! A small one but a true potato.” I showed it to my husband and my son. It was about two inches long.

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I cooked them and my husband ate it. He said it was delicious.

I transferred the plants into bigger pots hoping I can get more harvest soon. Here they are now in their new home. I planted one with cilantro.

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And the other one with thyme.

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Until next time. Keep on gardening.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

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How many red roses do you have in your garden?

Today is National Red Rose Day. A red rose conjures of romantic love, passion, respect and courage. In celebration of the National Red Rose Day, I’m listing the red roses in my garden. I have 21 red roses, 17 varieties.

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1.       1 Mister Lincoln – dark red – Hybrid Tea

2.      2 Veterans’ Honor – dark red – Hybrid Tea

3.      1 Firefighter – dark red – Hybrid Tea

4.      1 Ingrid Bergman – dark red – Hybrid Tea

5.      1 Drop Dead Red – dark red – Floribunda

6.      1 Let Freedom Ring – medium red – Hybrid Tea

7.      2 Dublin Bay – medium red – Climber

8.     1 Miracle on the Hudson – medium red -Shrub

9.      1 Oso Easy Cherry Pie – medium red – Shrub

10.  1 Othello – medium red – Shrub

11.   1 Grande Amore – medium red – Hybrid Tea

12.  1 Cramoisi Superieur – medium red – China

13.  1 Louis Philippe – red blend – China

14.  1 Fourth of July – red blend – Climber

15.  2 Scentimental – red blend – Floribunda

16.  2 Rock & Roll – red blend – Grandiflora

17.   1 Dick Clark – red blend – Grandiflora

 

Here is a poem by Robert Burns (1759-1796) titled

A RED. RED ROSE

 O, my Luve’s like a red, red rose,

That’s newly sprung in June.

O, my Luve’s like a melodie

That’ sweetly play’d in tune.

 

As fair as thou, my bonnie lass,

So deep in love am I;

And I will love thee still, my dear,

Till a’ the seas gang dry.

 

Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,

And the rocks melt wi’ the sun:

I will love thee still, my dear,

Thile the sands o’ life shall run:

 

And fare thee well, my only luve!

And fare thee weel a while!

And I will come again, my luve,

Tho’ it ware ten thousand mile.

 

 

Happy National Red Rose Day!

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda R Morgan

 

Posted in #Author's Life, #Love, #Romance, Blogging, Poems, Rose Gardening, Roses | 2 Comments

MEMORIAL DAY – A DAY OF REMEMBRANCE

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Lest we forget, Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s wars.

Established in the 1860s during the American Civil War, Memorial Day tapped into the general human need to honor our dead who have done so much to serve this great country.

Memorial Day originated in a ceremony called Decoration Day in 1868 was originally observed as a memorial by the northern states to the Union soldiers who died in the Civil War.  Memorial Day became a federal holiday in 1971 and has been an annual tribute to those who have given their lives in service to their country.  May 30th was initially designated as Memorial Day but an Act of Congress moved Memorial Day to the last Monday in May which this year is May 29.

The day has and always should be a day when we all take a moment to honor and reflect upon these men and women of the armed forces who have made the supreme sacrifice in times of wars to protect our freedom.  They perished in service to their country and for each and every man, woman, and child who calls the United States home.   

Happy Memorial Day and remember.

Posted in Blogging, Historical Events, Memorial Day, U.S. History, WAR MEMORIAL | 1 Comment

BAHALA NA (Come What May) reduced price in time for Memorial Day

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With Memorial Day approaching, I am offering “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” on Kindle at a discounted price of $2.99 for a limited time starting today. “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” is dedicated to the men of the armed forces who fought bravely to protect my old country, The Philippines, against the Japanese forces. “BAHALA NA (Come What May) is about my father’s experience before and during WWII. There is a snippet of my parent’s love story in it.

With just over 75 years after Pearl Harbor and only a few WWII veterans left, we should not forget those brave men and women who fought to keep our country safe. Let us keep their memories alive.

“BAHALA NA (Come What May)” is available at Amazon.com both in Kindle and paperback.

Order you copy today!

 

Until Next time. Keep on reading.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

Posted in Blogging, Historical Novels, Philippine History, U.S. History, War in the Philipines, WAR MEMORIAL, WWII | 3 Comments

TEN WORDS TO IMPROVE YOUR VOCABULARY THIS MONTH

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English is not my native language but I am curious enough to learn a new word all the time. When I read a book and come upon a new word, I have a habit of checking it in my Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary. I have been doing this since I was in high school. It’s a great way to enlarge your vocabulary.

Do you know that studies have shown that your income and wealth are directly related to the size and depth of your vocabulary? I’m still working on this and working hard at it I must say.

Here are this month’s words, so you can impress your friends and colleagues, and maybe even fatten your wallet!

 

1.       abatis – (noun) – a defensive obstacle formed by felled trees with sharpened branches facing the enemy

2.      cockade – (noun) – an ornament (as a rosette) worn on the hat as a badge

3.      comestible – (noun) – food usually used in plural.

4.      corduroyed – (verb) – to build a road of logs laid side by side transversely

5.      espiègle – (adjective) – frolicsome, roguish

6.      feint – (noun) – a mock blow or attack on or toward one part in order to distract attention from the point one really intends to attack

7.      integument – (noun) – something that covers or encloses

8.     meerschaum – (noun) – a tobacco pipe of a fine light clayey mineral that is a hydrous magnesium silicate found chiefly in Asia Minor.

9.      orgulous – (adjective) – meaning proud, haughty

10.  suppurate – (verb) – to form or discharge pus

 

Have you encountered a new word this month? Share it on the comments section.

 

Until Next time. Keep on reading.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

Posted in #amwriting, #Author's Life, #Books, Blogging, Word Usage, Writer's Goal | Leave a comment

Rose Glossary

 

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‘Our Lady of Guadalupe’

 

 

Here is a Rose Glossary to help you understand some rose terms and enjoy your rose gardening hobby to the fullest.

 

AARS – All American Rose Selections

AGRS – American Garden Rose Selections

ADR rose – a winner in the German ADR rose trial (Allgemeine Deutsche Rosenneuheitenprüfung). No chemical pesticides have been allowed since 1997.

ARC – American Rose Center

ARS – American Rose Society

Anther – the part of the flower which produces pollen.  It is the upper section of the stem.

Axil – The angle between the upper surface of the leaf stalk and the stem that carries it.

Balling – the clinging together of petals in wet weather so that the bloom fails to open and turns to brown color.

Bare-root – a rose dug up at the nursery and sold with no soil around the roots.

Basal shoot – a shoot arising from the neck or crown of the plant.

Blind shoot – a mature stem which fails to produce a flower.

Bloom – stem having one-bloom-per-stem with no side buds.

Bract – a modified or reduced leaf that occurs beneath and next to a peduncle.

Bud eye – A dormant bud on the axil of a leaf.

Bud stage – Rose should be less than 50% open.  Sepals must be down.

Bud Union – the swollen part of the stem where the scion of a grafted rose meets the understock.

Calyx – the green protective cover of a rose flower, composed of the sepals.

Cane – one of the main stems of a rose plant.

Corolla – the petals of a rose flower considered as a single unit.

Cultivar – a named rose variety exhibiting distinct and consistent features, indicated by single quotation marks.

Deadheading – removing spent flowers.

Disbudding – removing buds from side or center of spray to improve overall appearance of specimen.

Disease Resistant Roses – Roses that have been bred to resist many diseases.  Disease resistant are just that resistant but not immune to disease.

Foliar feed – a fertilizer capable of being sprayed on and absorbed by the leaves.

Hard Pruning – Rose canes are severely cut back to less than 6”. Not all types of roses respond well to this treatment.

Hilling – A method used to protect roses from winter damage. Material, such as compost, is mounded 10-12 inches around the base of the bush after the ground is frozen.

Hip – the fruit of a rose, large and decorative in some varieties.

Inflorescence – the arrangement of flowers on the stem.

Lateral branch – a side branch which arises from a main stem.

Leaflet – the individual segment of a compound rose leaf.

Node – the point on a stem from which leaves and buds emerge.

Old rose – strictly speaking, a rose introduced before 1867, but more loosely used to describe any rose grown or introduced before 1900.

Once-blooming – a rose that flowers only once in early summer and does not repeat.

Open bloom – roses should be completely open and center stamen visible.

Own root – a rose propagated as a cutting rather than by grafting.

Peduncle – a stalk that supports a single flower or flower cluster.

Petal – the showy, usually colored part of a flower.

Petiole – the stalk by which a leaf attaches to a stem; also, leafstalk.

Pistil – the female reproductive organ of a flower, consisting of carpels, ovary, style, and stigma.

Pith – the spongy material at the center of the stem.

Pollen – the yellow dust produced by the anthers.  It is the male element which fertilizes the ovule.

Prickle – the technical term for a rose thorn.

Recurrent flowering – same as repeat flowering.

Remontant – roses that repeat flowers during the season, same as repeat flowering.

Rootstock – the root portion of a plant onto which the scion is grafted; also understock.

Rose Rustler – a person who propagates Old Garden roses from cemeteries and old homes sites.  Etiquette requires that permission be obtained if possible before cuttings are taken.

Scion – a shoot grafted onto a rootstock; the “top” of a grafted rose.

Sepal – one of the five individual, leaflike divisions of the calyx.

Sport – a spontaneous genetic mutation, often resulting in a plant that bears flowers of a different color or with more or fewer petals than the original plant.

Spray – stem that has two or more blooms with or without side buds.

Stamen – the male reproductive organ of a flower, consisting of a filament and anther.

Standard rose – a term used for tree rose.

Stigma – the part of the female organ of the flower which catches the pollen.

Stipule – a small, leaflike appendage that occurs at the base of the petiole.

Sucker – a stem, usually unwanted, that originates from a rootstock.

Sustainable Roses – are those roses that are winter hardy, possess above average insect & disease resistance, and require little or no pesticides in order to remain healthy.

Stage – an exhibition rose that is at its most perfect phase of possible beauty.

Stem-on-stem – Refers to a bloom on a stem that branches off another stem. This Y formation cannot be exhibited.

 

 

Until Next Time. Stop and Smell the Rose.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

 

www.rosalindarmorgan.com

Posted in Blogging, Rose Gardening, Roses | Leave a comment

What was the inspiration for your recent novel, “The Wentworth Legacy”?

I’ve been asked a few times about my inspiration for “The Wentworth Legacy” and so here it is.

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When we moved to Long Island in 1971, I was exposed to the life of the old money. My mother-in-law had remarried after her husband died to a member of what I considered the upper class of the North Shore of Long Island. As such, I was lucky to see some of the homes of the wealthy families of the North Shore which somehow got into the pages of my book. I came to dine at Piping Rock Club in Locust Valley and Colony Club in New York, both are exclusive country clubs for the old money. No, my husband and I were not members of those clubs although he was a member of the Knickerbocker Club in New York. My mother-in-law was a member of both Piping Rock and Colony.

I saw and heard stories about the life above and below stairs from people around me. It was both fascinating and intimidating at first but as the years went on, I learned to be comfortable with the new aspect of my married life. It was a far cry from where I came from – a small town in the Philippines.

We are often asked if we are related to J.P. Morgan. We are not. My husband said they came on different boats. People often wondered why my husband knew so many old money in the community. My husband’s parents were not rich although I sensed his grandmother was. They were comfortable but their social standing was far above most of the people I knew.

So, the idea of writing a book about the old money came from being around some of them. This time, the North Shore in “The Wentworth Legacy”, next time, the South Shore in “?????”. Stay tuned.

 

Posted in #amwriting, #Author's Life, #Books, #LongIslandGoldCoast, #mustreadbooks, #Romance, Blogging, Historical Novels | Leave a comment