Controlling Some Rose Disease Problems the Safest Way

Knock Out Roses

A bed of Knock Out Roses at Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

 

As long as you can develop tolerance and not demand total perfection, you can enjoy growing roses without knowing all the solutions to every rose diseases. As we get older, we just don’t have the energy to maintain a perfect disease free rose garden. As you will see in this article, I don’t recommend chemicals. Sanitation in the garden to me is the most important part of my rose gardening practice.

 

Blackspot is a fungal disease found most often on Hybrid Teas, Floribundas, and Grandfloras. Circular blackspots with feathery edge appear on leaves and stems, often surrounded by yellow patches.

Blackspot

Photo Credit – Missouri Botanic Garden

Control: Mulch right up to the canes to prevent spores from splashing on the rose leaves during heavy rain. Water the roots, but don’t wet the leaves of plants. Pick off infected leaves, remove any fallen leaves, and cut off infected stems. Prevent by spraying weekly and after rains with baking-soda solution of 1 tablespoon baking soda plus a tablespoon of light horticultural oil to 1 gallon of water.

 

Canker is a less troublesome fungal disease. Pruning cuts or wounds on stems provide an opening for germinating spores causing dark, swollen areas that can kill off a cane.

Canker - extension.umn.edu

Photo Credit – extension.umn.edu

Control: The simplest treatment is not leaving stubs during normal pruning of susceptible roses and by ensuring that their canes are not chafing against each other or against any other objects like trellis or training ties. Also prune away and trash any infected canes.

 

Crown Gall is a very serious bacterial disease of roses. It is a hard, tumor-type growths that can occur at the crown, bud union or on the roots. It is caused by bacteria in the soil, and are more likely to occur on grafted than own-root roses by entering at the bud union.

Crown Gall

Photo Credit – Missouri Botanic Garden

Control: Prevent by covering the soil around rose canes with a thick layer of soft mulch, like shredded bark, which prevents raindrops from splashing soil on canes, and be careful not to damage canes when planting. Once established, crown gall is incurable; remove and destroy the plant.

 

Powdery mildew first appears on young leaves where the leaves appear blistered or curled, with a haze of powdery white fungus and can spread to older leaves. Buds are also affected and many not open properly.

Powdery Mildew - Gardeners' World .com

Photo Credit – gardeners’world.com

Control: Space and prune plants for good air circulation. Treatment is the same as with blackspot and can also be controlled by water washes at weekly intervals. Prune away and destroy all infected parts.

 

Rose Mosaic is the most commonly found virus in roses. The leaves appear to be wavy and have yellow lightening patterns, oak leaf patterns or simply gold to yellow veins. Plants infected with virus usually produce fewer good quality blooms. During the warm summer, typical symptoms can disappear only to come back as fall and cooler temperatures arrive.

Rose Mosaic

Photo Credit – Missouri Botanic Garden

 Control: Since there is no cure for the virus disease, it is important to purchase only quality roses which has no symptoms of the disease. Just an added note, I had ‘Elina’ with rose mosaic. I was new to rose gardening at that time and was wondering while the leaves had a wavy pattern. Even then, I kept the plant for several years. I got some nice blooms and the disease never spread to the neighboring roses. I kept the plant and still in the garden when I sold my house.

 

Rose Rosette is a very serious rose disease and there is no cure so far. The foliage on the affected plant looks like witch’s broom, the leaflets looking distorted and wrinkled. It is believed to be caused by a virus carried from plant to plant by mites, or the reaction of the plant to substances injected by blister mites. It is rampant with Knock Out roses.

Rose Rosette

Photo Credit – Missouri Botanic Garden

Control: There is no known cure for the disease and once it is established in a plant, it could spread to other roses in your yard. You can lose your entire rose garden. Dig out the affected plant and discard it in the trash. Do not put it on the compost heap. I also don’t have any Knock Out roses. I dug them all up when I bought our townhouse.

 

Rust is easily identifiable rose disease. Raised dots of light orange or yellow can appear anywhere on the plant, but usually first show on the underside of leaves then spread on the upper sides of leaves. The spores are wind borne and germinate to infect the leaves. Spore germination requires cool summer temperatures and continuous moisture for at least two hours so the germ tubes can enter the leaf stomata.

Rust - flickr.com

Photo Credit – Flickr.com

Control: Infected leaves should be pruned in spring to prevent early season infections. Sanitation in the garden will reduce the spread of disease. Good air circulation by pruning dense growth will reduce the moisture level and prevent infection.

 

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses.

Rosalinda

 

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The Wentworth Legacy

 

In 1927 while on a Grand Tour, Spencer A. Wentworth, a young scion of a wealthy old banking family of Long Island, New York Gold Coast, receives an urgent telegram to come home immediately. No explanation.

 Upon arriving home, he was handed a huge responsibility that he was not prepared for.

As the stock market begins to collapse, he is plagued with worries that the family will lose everything including Wentworth Hall, his ancestral home. Honoring his promise to preserve it, he is determined to save Wentworth Hall at any cost including the loss of the woman he loves.

It is a tale of responsibility, love, betrayal and suspense during the Gilded Age with a backdrop of a way of life long gone.

 

Take advantage of the Limited Time Offer. Get your copy today!

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

A Rose (Rosa Banksiae) and a Tip for a Happy and Healthy Lifestyle

Rosa Banksiae

Class: Rose Species

Syns:   R. banksiana, Banksian rose, Banks’ Rose, Lady Banks’

Cultivated since 1796

 

Rosa banksiae is one of the best shrubs for a wall and in a few years will reach the top of most houses. It produces an abundance of pretty small roses with the sweetest fragrance you can imagine. The flowers are borne on last year’s wood and so it is well-advised not to prune in the spring. Only dead or useless branches have to be trimmed. The date of introduction is not known but the double white form was first described in the Botanical Magazine for 1818 as Lady Banks’ Rose and one of the sweetest of roses. It has also been known as a native of China and had been introduced in 1807 by William Kerr. The double yellow was introduced in 1824.

 

Definitely not for the small property, this vigorous species rose offers a spectacular spring show in warm-climate gardens that can accommodate its rampant growth habit. There are four different forms of R. banksiae, varying by flower color and flower form.

·        R. banksiae normalis is considered to be the “wild” form, with single white flowers.

·        R. banksiae banksiae (also known as ‘Banksiae Alba’, R. banksiae alba, R.banksiae alba-plena, White Banksia, or White Lady Banks’ Rose) offers exceptionally fragrant, double white flowers.

·        R. banksiae lutea (R. banksiae lutea-plena, Yellow Lady Banks’ Rose) is the most well-known form of Rosa banksiae in cultivation with small, fully double, bright yellow flowers that come in clusters. They are only slightly fragrant.

·        R. Banksiae lutescens has single light yellow blooms.

 

All four have small, oval buds that open to clustered, 1-inch wide, rosette-form flowers, usually blooming in early or midspring to late spring. Slender, thornless canes carry semi-evergreen to evergreen, shiny, dark green leaves with narrow leaflets. They are rarely bothered by diseases.

 

All four forms of this specie rose have a vigorous, rambling habit and can grow up to 30 ft, so they’re usually used as 20 to 30-foot climbers. They need a sturdy support, such as a well-built pergola or arbor; they also like to scramble into trees. It is a great rose for zone 8 to 10.

 

I saw Rosa banksiae in Charleston, SC on my first visit there in 1989. We went on a House and Garden Tour and at one of the gardens we visited, ‘Yellow Lady Banks’ was growing almost to the roof of the house against the wall. We wandered along some tiny street and I saw ‘Yellow Lady Banks’ rose by the gate and I took the above photo. Fast forward to 2011 – when I joined the Charleston Lowcountry Rose Society, I discovered the owner of that rose is one of our members.

 

Tip of the Day – Learn to be cheerful even if you don’t feel like it.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

 

Rosalinda

 

Have You Filed Your Income Tax Return?

Income Tax

You only have six days left to do your tax return. So get going. Deadline is April 17. I just did ours.

On April 1, my husband told me he could no longer do our tax return this year. Since the deadline is fast approaching, I then volunteered to do it. My husband, being from the old school, had this puzzled look on his face. Somehow I had this funny feeling he did not think I could do a tax return, not having done it for almost 50 years.

Well, well, well… There goes the challenge and I love being challenged.

I told him if a friend of us who has no accounting background can work for H & R Block to do taxes, I believe I can do my own income tax return.

I did my own tax return before I got married. My husband’s accountant took over after we got married and when we moved from Manhattan to Long Island, my husband handled the tax returns although I handled the household finance. I handled our bank account and paid all the household bills. Do I know how to do a tax return?

I had less than three weeks to do my son’s return and ours. What makes you think I can do two returns in less than three weeks when I have not done it for 48 years? Lack of practice. I could have forgotten how to do it. Besides I’m busy with other things all day long?

Well. . .

For starter, I have a degree in accounting. I passed the C.P.A. board examination on my first try at the age of 21. That was moons ago. I worked in the accounting field for 32 years and I was a company controller when I retired. That was 18 years ago. I retired early so don’t even start counting my age. I’m 102. OK? Really? Funny!!! I’m one of those accountants with a sense of humor. Not many of us do. Believe me, I found most of them boring especially at parties. All they talk about is office talk and numbers. How about some other topics like art? Maybe even dogs or gardening? How about history like WWII?

While I was working as an Assistant Controller and then as a Controller, I prepared Form 1120, the Corporate Income Tax Return and as a treasurer for non-profit organizations, I did Form 990, the Tax Return for Non-Profit Organizations. Also, while I was an Assistant Controller for an insurance company, I also prepared the quarterly and annual financial statements filing for the NAIC (National Association of Insurance Commissioners) for various states that we were doing business with and they were more complex and had more schedules because of our stock holdings and other investments. Now, I’m really talking about boring stuffs!

Do I know how to do a tax return? It’s like asking me if I forgot how to breathe. Form 1040 is nothing compared to Form 1120.

And so I gathered all the documents I needed for my income and expenses and went to work. I did my son’s return first. That was a snap. Then I did ours which involved more schedules to be attached to the 1040.

During all those years that my husband was doing our tax returns, I never read our tax returns. I mean he told me to sign the dotted line and so I just signed the return. I wanted to read it but he insisted I didn’t have to. Fine with me! I don’t argue with him. Not all the time anyway. That’s why I’m still married. We don’t argue. We just have different opinion. Anyway, he prepared our taxes with the help of Turbo Tax. I’m sure a lot of people use Turbo Tax to do their taxes. I refuse to spend money on things I can do myself.

I started filling up the form with the data I had on hand. Then I reviewed all my entries. When I got stuck with a question, I read the instruction. If you have to do various schedules, I can understand it can get complicated so unless you have an accounting background, guaranteed you’ll get too discouraged to do it. But trust me, you can do it. It just takes patience and understanding on what the instructions say. It needs concentration. I did our taxes in the afternoon when my husband was taking a nap. The house was quiet and my brain could concentrate.

By the way, at some point in our marriage, my husband worked for H & R Block part time. That gave him the confidence he knew about taxes. He also has a business degree major in Finance. I have a business degree major in Accounting. He worked on Wall St. for 25 years and then switched to accounting later on because it was too stressful working on the Big Board especially on a down market. I worked in the accounting field for 32 years until I retired. So who was more qualified to do a tax return? You be the judge.

The key to making your job easy is to keep your tax papers organized. All receipts and expenses that are related to your tax return should be kept in one place. As a former accountant, I have the habit of keeping all my receipts, both income and expenses. I also charged everything on one credit card which itemized my charges for the whole year. All your doctor’s visits should be on your calendar so you can figure out the mileage which is part of your medical expenses. 17 cents per mile can add up since during your golden years, you spent lots of time in the doctor’s office. Stock transactions might have to be itemized so you have to have that handy in a spreadsheet in case your stockbroker does not supply you with the Capital Gains/Losses schedule.

Well, I finished my tax return a week before the deadline. I saved money by not using Turbo Tax or a tax preparer. Both state and Federal returns were mailed this afternoon. Most importantly, I feel good that I’m back at my own game. However, I will only do tax returns for my family. I’m retired you know.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

 

Friday Funnies – Loving Husband

 

Old couple by Clipartlogo.com

 

Time for some laughter. I dug this one up from an old blog of mine at activerain.com when I used to blog Friday Funnies on Fridays and Wordless Wednesday on Wednesdays.

 

A man and his ever-nagging wife went to Jerusalem for vacation. While they were there, the wife passed away.

 

The funeral director told the husband. “You can ship her remains home for $5,000 or bury her here in the Holy Land for $200. The husband thought about it.

 

After a while, he told the funeral director that he would like to have the remains shipped home. The funeral director asked, “Why would you spend $5,000 to ship your wife home when it would be wonderful to have her buried here in the Holy Land for only $200?”

 

The husband replied. “Long time ago, a man died here, was buried here, and three days later he rose from the dead. I just can’t take that chance.”

 

Until next time. Keep smiling.

Rosalinda

 

Welcome Spring, A Time of Renewal

 

IMG_0705

 

I love living in the South where spring comes early. While NY where I came from is still having freezing weather and snow storm is still the norm in March, here in Charleston, the days are getting longer and warm air is creeping in. As I walk the dog this morning, I heard birds singing and frolicking in the lake.  There are so much colors around me. The azaleas are in full bloom. Pansies are smiling with their happy face. The tulips are practically done. Daffodils are still in bloom and this year, my hyacinths are just glorious. I had them once in New York but mine usually grew so tall there, then plopped down so I gave up on them. Last fall, I decided to plant some here and I really love it. They are gorgeous and very fragrant. I can smell the wonderful scent as I open my front door.

IMG_2845.JPG

 

Since we had some icy weather last winter, I lost some of my plants to ice. I replaced some of them and tried some new ones. I miss Shima-Nishiki peony that I had in NY with its stunning striped blooms so when I saw it in a catalog on sale, I bought two.

Shima-Nishiki Peony

 

I have always wanted to plant grapes but never did until this year. I bought RazzMatazz, a breakthrough in grape breeding. It tastes like Muscadines yet has a tender-crisp texture of a regular table grape and it is seedless. It also bears continuously and it does not have to be sprayed for diseases and insects. We’ll see how it grows. I wish I have a bigger yard so I can really go to town with my gardening.

 

Some of the roses are showing some buds already and some of the old garden roses have started to bloom. I hope to have plenty of blooms in May because I’m doing a rose display at Johns Island Public Library for the whole month and I need a fresh bouquet of roses twice a week for the whole month. I have done most of my spring cleaning in the garden and now am delighted to see new growth coming up.

 

Inside the house, spring cleaning is a rite of passage. Winter clothes have to go up in the attic for storage and spring and summer clothes come down. You feel tired looking at those dreary dark-colored drapery. There is this urge to change the look to spring with light flowery curtains. I must admit, I did not change my curtains last winter. I like my yellow curtains with roses on them so I kept it year round.

 

I kept staring at my wall. My husband looked at me askance. I said, “I’m thinking.” He said, “So I see. I smell something burning.” Funny, ha? I wanted to paint the wall but could not decide whether to stay with the “developer’s” boring beige or go for light green. Green is my favorite color, the color of nature. That is a no-brainer. I am a gardener.

 

Regarding my writing, I’m determined to publish my nonfiction this spring, most likely early May. I’ve been doing a lot of blogging lately trying to sharpen my writing skills. I still have a lot to learn. After I publish my nonfiction, I want to edit my next fiction about a white-collar crime. I’ve never written a mystery/thriller before but I love to challenge myself. I like historical novel but as an accountant, I love the plot on this book. So things are looking up again in my writing journey. In the meantime, check some of my blogs. I have several blogs going on. I will try to reblog some of my posts from the other blogs into my website – www.rosalindarmorgan.com so check it out.

 

After a slow winter, there is that energy that invigorate us to spring forward. There is the spiritual renewal in spring too. With Easter, we celebrate the resurrection of Christ. For a practicing Catholic, it is the most sacred of Holidays and it means a lot to me. On Easter, we renew our baptismal promise. The church always looks splendid with Easter lilies and spring flowers, giving us a sense of rebirth.

Easter Morning 1

 

Happy Spring. Enjoy the warming weather.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda