Cavite Province and Its History – Part III

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Monument marking the execution site of the Gomburza in Rizal Park
Photo Credit: Wikipedia by Windows72106 

In 1869, the Spanish Cortes recognized individual freedom of expression, association, and worship, legalized civil marriage, and introduced the jury system. A wealthy liberal, Carlos Maria de la Torre, was sent to the Philippines as the new governor-general. Once installed, de la Torre banned flogging in the military, lifted restrictions on the press, public demonstrations, and forming of associations aimed at reform, etc. This behavior did not sit well with the long-time Spanish expatriates and clergy, who feared such a display of liberalism would entertain ideas of a free society.

Unfortunately, Amadeo of Savoy was installed as Spanish King, and de la Torre was recalled in 1871 and replaced by Rafael de Izquierdo, who promptly restored the restrictions. He also withdrew the exemption from tribute and forced labor (polos y servicios) that…

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Cavite Province and Its History – Part II

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Due to its military importance, Cavite had been attacked by foreigners in their quest to conquer Manila and the Philippines.

In 1647, the Dutch made a surprise attack on the city, pounding the port incessantly, but were repulsed. At Sangley Point still stands the ruins of Porta Vaga Church which was destroyed during the attack. San Roque Church, near the ruins, houses Porta Vaga’s patron – a 17th century painting of Nuestra Señora de la Soledad.

Our Lady of Solitude de Porta Vaga, Patroness of Cavite Province – Photo Credit: Percy s a Carballo

During the 17th century, Cavite City developed as a center for shipbuilding and naval operations. Giant molave trees from the forest around Paete were floated across Laguna de Bay, down the Pasig River, and across Manila Bay to Cavite, where many of the great Manila galleons were built.

When the Spaniards decided to withdraw…

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Cavite Province and Its History – Part I

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Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons by Jimboy085

Cavite province extends south of Manila along Manila Bay and includes Corregidor Island, and bounds the provinces of Rizal, Laguna, and Batangas. The proximity of Manila provides a job and agricultural market, particularly for coastal residents. In 1954, Trece Martires City was created as a planned capital city from portions of Tanza, Indang, Naic, and General Trias. Despite the transfer of capital status to Imus in 1979, Trece Martires retains many offices of the provincial government, acting thus as the de facto capital and seat of the government of the province, although Imus is the official (de jure) capital.

Cavite takes its name from the Hispanicized form of kawit, or it may be an altered form of kalawit, Tagalog words for “hook”, in reference to the hook-shaped peninsula jutting out to Manila Bay. The name initially applied to the peninsula, Cavite…

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A Few Suggestions to Stay Healthy

Stop and Smell the Roses - Stay Healthy and Stress Free

By: Rosalinda Morgan

Author,Saving Wentworth Hall

Here are a few suggestions to stay healthy. I’ve been practicing healthy habits since I’m in my early 40s, and it shows because, at this last quarter stage of my life, I have no health issues and do not take any prescription drugs.

Dementia is one issue affecting the elderly. As you get old, you seem to forget things. Losing your keys is a minor sign, but if you keep forgetting something or forget what you said constantly, you should begin to worry. Walking, doing the crossword puzzle, cooking, and reading keep your brain active. I read a lot, write quite a bit, and am an editor of two quarterly newsletters. Exercise or any physical activity will increase your brain’s protective proteins and lower your risk of developing dementia. I also take time to garden – taking care of my 60 roses and…

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Happy National Jeep Day, Angels!

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In June 1940, with World War II on the horizon, the U.S. Army solicited bids from 135 automakers for a 1/4 ton “light reconnaissance vehicle” tailored to Army specifications. Only three companies responded — Bantam, Willys, and Ford — but, within a year’s time they collectively produced the template for the vehicle known worldwide as the “jeep”.

Willys-Overland delivered the prototype “Quad” (named for the 4×4 system it featured), to the U.S. Army on Armistice Day (Veteran’s Day), November of 1940. The design was completed in a remarkable 75 days.

During the ensuing years, from WWII to Vietnam, the Angels made use of this historic vehicle in training, combat and occupation duty. From Toccoa to Tokyo, Fort Campbell to Korea, Germany and Fort Benning, the 11th Airborne’s troopers drove, stole, and maneuvered the Jeep through some of the toughest conditions possible.

They came to respect the Jeep as no other…

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A tribute to my parents on their 79th wedding anniversary if they are here today

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With the war going on in Ukraine, I thought of the war in the Philippines when I was a baby. War is a terrible thing, and in memory of my parent’s 79th wedding anniversary, I’m reposting this story of how Dad’s decision saved our lives from the massacre. Otherwise, my three brothers and I won’t be here today. Happy Anniversary, Mom and Dad! Love you both and miss you every day!

I sent this story four years ago to a fellow blogger, GPCox, who blogs about WWII in the Pacific at https://PacificParatrooper.wordpress.com. It is an excerpt from my book, BAHALA NA, Come What May. If you’re a fan of WWII Pacific Theatre, go and visit Pacific Paratrooper and say hello to GP.

Thank you.

Mom and Dad are on the terrace during their 50th Wedding Anniversary celebration at their home.

My father told me this story of what happened…

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Happy Valentine’s Day

Here’s looking at you, kid. A Grande Amore Rose for you!


I wish I could remember that first day,
First hour, first moment of your meeting me,
If bright or dim the season, it might be
Summer or Winter for aught I can say;
So unrecorded did it slip away,
So blind was I to see and to foresee,
So dull to mark the budding of my tree.

By Christina Rossetti, ‘The First Day’.













So, what now?

I would like to thank Ben Punongbayan for allowing me to repost this series. It is an eye-opener and food for thought for the Filipino people. I hope the right leader will emerge in the near future!

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IF I WERE THE NEXT PRESIDENT (Part 15 and last of a series)

By BEN R. PUNONGBAYAN

Founder, Buklod National Political Party

We need the right leader to make the many programs articulated in this Commentary Series happen.

Unfortunately, we cannot find that person from the present cohort of political leaders. These present leaders are trapped in the current self-serving political practices, such as perpetuation of political power, abuse of power in various forms, pork barrel budget allocations, corruption, and prevention of legislations that seek to check or prevent such self-serving practices.

Because of the preoccupation to these self-serving practices, making government to work efficiently is neglected; and conspiracy in lower-level corruption is given a blind eye.

As a result of all these, funds that are needed for the general welfare and betterment of the lives of the people become limited and inadequate. For this reason, poverty, homelessness, child…

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How Filipinos Welcome the New Year

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Filipinos have a unique way of welcoming the New Year. Many of these superstitions have been passed down through generations, and they become part of the Filipino customs and traditions in the belief of ushering in a prosperous New Year.

To prepare for New Year’s Eve, Filipinos spend the last days of the year vigorously cleaning everything. However, you are not supposed to do any cleaning on New Year’s Day, so you don’t sweep away the good fortune that came in on New Year’s Eve.

Filipinos try to dress in polka-dots because anything round signifies prosperity. Pockets are filled with round coins, which are jangled to attract wealth. Coins are also scattered around the house, on top of tables and in drawers.

Before the clock strikes midnight to herald in the new year, turn on all lights so that the coming year is bright. All doors must be left wide…

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Acculturating essential values

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IF I WERE THE NEXT PRESIDENT (Part 14 of a series)

By BEN R. PUNONGBAYAN

Founder, Buklod National Political Party

In the earlier parts of this Commentary Series, I dwell on the more important reforms and actions that the government must do to make the lives of the Filipino people much better, achieve higher economic growth and improve public governance.

To help achieve all these goals and maintain and sustain such achievements, it is necessary that the Filipino people themselves imbibe some essential cultural values that we still have yet to acquire.

The first among these values is giving respect to the rights of others. We tend to assert strongly our own rights but conveniently forget that the fellow citizens we live with have also the same rights.

When we break into a waiting line, we are blatantly ignoring the rights of others. When we drive against the flow of…

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