Sipa – A Traditional, Native Philippine Sport

Here is a fun way to expend your energy!

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While everyone is thinking about the Super Bowl today, let me introduce you to a traditional, native Philippine sport. It’s not basketball which most Filipinos consider the national sport since it is played every day across the country, on the streets, in gyms, at schools and everywhere else in the Philippines.

The sport “Sipa” which literally means kick or to kick is a home-grown national sport. Historically, Sipa is considered the Philippine national and traditional native sport which predates the Spanish rule going back to the 15th century. Both boys and girls play this sport. A single person can play sipa by himself or herself but there are moves to standardize the game with rules and teams.

In formal games, a rattan ball is used, but when Filipino kids play at home or in schools they use either a big bunch of rubber bands knotted together or a small…

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Wang Wanggao in search of Limahong

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limahong channel by ilocoshotel.com Limahong Channel – Photo Credit: ilocoshotels.com

The Viceroy of Fokien, having heard of Limahong’s daring exploits, had commissioned a ship of war to discover the whereabouts of Limahong, his imperial master’s old enemy.

Wang Wanggao, known in Spanish sources as Omocon, who was commissioned to capture Limahong dead or alive, arrived in Philippine waters and encountered the Spanish soldiers in Bolinao, Pangasinan.

The envoy was received with delight by the Spaniards. He was invited to accompany them to Manila to meet the Governor. Wang Wanggao went to Manila accompanied by Field Marshal Salcedo where the former was dined and entertained.

To cap it all, the governor ordered Salcedo and the soldiers to deliver to Wang Wanggao all Chinese pirates captured in Pangasinan. Then he ordered everything necessary for the voyage to be fully prepared, which was done within a few days. In return for all this kindness, Wang Wanggao offered…

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Camp Upton at Yaphank, NY

Long Island Past and Present

camp upton

During the hectic months after America’s entry into World War I in the spring of 1917, the government started construction of an Army installation in Suffolk country near Yaphank on a tract now housing the Brookhaven National Laboratory. There, on more than 10,000 acres of flat, swampy, mosquito-laden land, as many as 15,000 skilled workers and laborers struggled through the hot, wet summer to build barracks for 37,000 soldiers, mostly draftees.

Camp Upton was named after a Civil War Union general named Emory Upton. It was a marvel of logistics and supervision since almost all the workmen had to be fed and housed on the isolated site. Special railroad sidings were laid to facilitate the shipment of lumber and other materials, and a large number of private detectives had to be hired to cope with the influx of crooks who swarmed over the camp. Criminality was so rampant that a…

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Limahong’s Final Days in the Philippines

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limahong escape Photo Credit: fmapulse.com

Limahong with his men constructed some boats inside the fort out of the half burnt remnants of his fleet which his men had brought into the fort at night without being detected by the Spaniards. The Chinese had made good use of the blockade also which lasted for three months by repairing the breaches on the walls and the damage of the fire which almost gutted his inner fort.

Under such circumstances, Salcedo’s effort to blockade the Chinese fort seemed to be fruitless. Neither side would take the risk of decisive operations and the war degenerated into skirmishes between small groups of Spaniards and some parties of Chinese going out for provisions or to cut wood.

A Council of War was called to plan other means to expel the Chinese from their fort. It was decided that the Spanish force should retire to an island in the…

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Ati-Atihan Festival – The Philippines’ Mardi Gras

Is Kalibo’s Ati-Atihan Festival better than New Orleans’ Mardi Gras?

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In 1212, as legend has it, 10 Bornean datu (chiefs), fleeing the collapse of the once-mighty Srivijayan empire, sailed northwards with their followers and landed on the island of Panay. At that time, Panay was widely populated by Negritos. The Bornean Malays, although superior fighters and better armed than the Negritos, chose not to take the island by force but rather to buy it from the native inhabitants. They struck a deal with the local chieftain. A contract was made between Datu (chieftain) Puti of the Bornean and the Negritos’ chief Marikudo. There the Borneans bought the coastal lands from the native Negrito inhabitants with gold, pearls and other ornaments.

ati-group-kalibo-festival- Photo Credit – philippinetraveldestinations.com

This legendary barter between Malays and native inhabitants is commemorated yearly in what is the most popular, colorful and exuberant festival in the whole country featuring a Mardi Gras like revelry worth a trip to Kalibo…

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Mystery Blogger Award

I’m excited to be nominated for the MYSTERY BLOGGER AWARD although I have no idea what MYSTERY BLOGGER AWARD is. This is the first time I received a nomination for any award at WordPress. It was a big surprise and I want to thank FortySomethingHeyHey for nominating me. Check her blog which is about Life is a Journey. It’s nice to be recognized by my fellow bloggers but a visit and a comment are good enough for me. I do appreciate the nomination very much but for now I would like to have my blog as Award Free Blog.

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I still feel obligated to answer the following:

Three things about me:

  1. I have lived all my life in four different islands but never learned how to swim.
  2. When I passed my C.P.A. board exam, I was the first graduate from my university to earn the C.P.A. designation and earned a plague posted at the university hall for my achievement.
  3. At 23, in spite of not knowing anyone at the Big Apple, I arrived in New York as a legal immigrant with a P-3 visa (professional, took me a two-year wait) with $100 and a suitcase, landed a job as Jr. Accountant at ITT Corporation the first week after my arrival (three days actually) but told my employer I needed another week to acquaint myself with the City.

 

Answers to questions asked by FortySomethingHeyHey:

  1. How do you act if you see a big spider?

I’m not arachnophobic (fear of spider). Spiders do not bother me. A big one might surprise me. I most likely will get a broom or something and hit it. My youngest son got bitten by a big brown flesh-eating spider and ended in emergency. This one might scare me a bit for the injury it can create. It’s really a nasty creature.

  1. Dog or cat person?

Dog person. A dog named Dallas saved my life. Read this blog – “How I conquered my fear of dogs.” about Dallas.

  1. Are you content with your life?

Yes except for one thing. I want a piano and learn how to play the piano. Still a dream for me.

  1. Do you have any hobbies?

Reading and Gardening. Reading provides me an escape from the realities of life and gardening gives me a break from all the non-stop projects I seem to get myself involved with.

  1. Will you bungee jump?

No. I’m afraid of height. I want to keep my feet on the ground. I don’t even like plane ride.

 

Thanks again FortysomethingHeyHey for nominating me.

 

Until next time. Stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

 

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Limahong Invaded the Philippines – Part III

Limahong’s adventure continues . . .

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limahong_port Limahong Fort – Photo Credit: Watawat.net

Foiled in his attempt to establish a kingdom in Manila, Limahong set sail for Lingayen Gulf, to settle in Pangasinan province. As a rich place and far enough from the reach of the Spaniards and the Chinese emperor, Limahong decided he would stay in Pangasinan and make himself master of the region.

In a few days he landed in Sual Bay with 64 war junks and over 3,000 followers. He informed the natives that he had conquered the Spaniards and that he had come to rule over them as their king. The inhabitants there, having no particular choice between two masters, welcomed Limahong.

Limahong subjugated the inhabitants and seized their principal chiefs, holding them hostage so that they supplied him with wood and food as he set about the foundation of his new capital some four miles from the mouth of Agno River. He…

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