Collaborate, Collaborator, Collaboration, Collaborationism

According to my 1983 Webster Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary , collaborate came from the word collaboratus (Late Latin), with a past participle of collaborare meaning to labor together, from Latin  com-+ laborare to labor. Collaborate means 1. to work jointly with others or together exp. in an intellectual endeavor. 2. to cooperate with or willingly assist an enemy of one’s country and esp. an occupying force. 3. to cooperate with an agency or instrumentality with which one is not immediately connected.  Collaborationism is the advocacy or practice of collaboration with an enemy.

The 1933 version of the Oxford English Dictionary listed only one definition for collaborate: “To work in conjunction with another or others, to co-operate; esp, in a literary or artistic production, or the like.” In those days, when one thought of collaboration, what came to mind was Gilbert and Sullivan. In the 1972 supplement of that dictionary, a second definition appeared – “To co-operate traitorously with the enemy”. The word had been used in that way since World War II.

The first definition both at Oxford English Dictionary and at Webster New Collegiate Dictionary is obviously inappropriate for books written about war in the Philippines. The other definitions are similar, but, a little different. The OED definition uses the word traitorously, and is rather restrictive. It refers only to those whose cooperation is traitorous; hence, it does not apply to those whose cooperation falls short of traitorous behavior. Webster’s definition is also restrictive in a different way. By using the words usu. willingly, Webster’s is making a judgment about attitude – a judgment that the OED does not appear to make. One can, after all, act traitorously but feel otherwise.

In my book, “BAHALA NA, (Come What May)”, I used the definition meaning simply to cooperate with the enemy.

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. Collaborate, Collaborator, Collaboration, Collaborationism

Advertisements

Taal Volcano – A Complex Volcano

Taal Volcano, a complex volcano and known as the lowest volcano is one of the smallest active volcanoes in the world. It is situated in the midst of Taal Lake, in the southern part of Luzon in the Philippines, about 50 kilometers (31 miles) south of Manila, in the province of Batangas. It is located between the towns of Talisay and San Nicolas in the province of Batangas.

Taal Volcano, was once a huge volcano towering at 18,000 feet. It seems small now but it was one of the largest volcanoes in the world. The volcano has erupted several times, causing loss of lives and devastating damage to the areas surrounding the lake. Thirty three eruptions have been recorded since 1572 at Taal, mostly on Volcano Island. The impacts of these eruptions were largely confined to the nearby areas with occasional violent eruption such as the 1749 eruption that reached the Metro Manila area and accompanied by strong earthquakes.

Taal volcano has a crater containing several lakes of many-colored boiling liquids. Taal Lake is often referred to as “the lake on an island on a lake on an island”. Right in the center of the island is the main crater of Taal Volcano that holds a sulfuric lake. Taal Volcano is one of the active volcanoes in the Philippines, all part of the Pacific ring of fire. It is famous for having an island in a lake on an island in a lake on an island in the Pacific Ocean. Quite a description and that’s what makes Taal Volcano unique.

Since the formation of the caldera, subsequent eruptions have created another volcanic island, within the caldera, known as Volcano Island. This island covers an area of about 23 km., and consists of overlapping cones and craters. Forty-seven different cones and craters have been identified on the island. Volcano Island contains a lake about 2 km across, called Crater Lake. Within Crater Lake is another small volcanic island, called Vulcan Point. Vulcan Point is frequently cited in the Philippines as the world’s largest volcanic island within a lake on an island within a lake on an island, namely, Vulcan Point within Crater Lake, on Taal Island within Lake Taal, on the island of Luzon. Are you confused yet? It’s a brain workout!

Within the island are four craters. The main crater is in the center of the island while the dormant volcano crater can be seen at the edge of the island. The third and fourth craters are called “Twin Craters” which were formed during the eruption of 1965. I was still in the Philippines at that time when that happened. I remember when I heard the news. I was working for Upjohn Inc in the Philippines when the president of the company who was an Australian rushed out of his office with a camera and said he was off to see the Taal Volcano erupting. He said it was a rare opportunity for him that he did not want to miss. You can view the eruption from Tagaytay ridge. Actually, Tagaytay Ridge is the rim of the volcano! When the volcano was 18,000 feet high, Tagaytay ridge would have been only about a sixth of the way to the top of the volcano!!

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. TAAL VOLCANO

Excerpts from BAHALA NA (Come What May)

Here is an excerpt from BAHALA NA (Come What May), a WWII novel of faith and survival:

On the evening of December 22, they made it to Paniqui, Tarlac on the way to the provincial capital of Tarlac. It was a good decision that they did not take the road to Lingayen. Delfin had the right instinct to avoid the area. They could be right in the face of danger. They were extremely lucky because that day, Dec. 22 at 2:00 A.M., General Masaharu Homma, Commander-in-chief of the Japanese forces in the Philippines, with his large fleet of warships and 43,000 soldiers landed on the palm-lined shores of the Lingayen Gulf, 120 miles north of Manila. There was heavy fighting but in the end, the American and Filipino troops were outnumbered and overpowered by the Japanese. Some of the Filipino scouts retreated to the mountains.

By this time, Benjamin and his group were already way ahead of the Japanese. But the Japanese were advancing toward Manila.

At 4:30 PM the same day, Dec. 22, Gen. Douglas MacArthur decided to declare Manila, an Open City in a futile attempt to save it. He ordered all supply depots and storage tanks razed. Manila was known as the Pearl of the Orient because of its majestic buildings and palm-lined boulevards. To be an open city, it meant it would not be defended and hopefully could be saved. In the meantime, stores were being looted of everything. Manila was in total chaos.

On December 23 Gen. MacArthur finally decided to implement War Plan Orange that called for withdrawal of his forces to the Bataan Peninsula where they would wait until help from America arrived. He didn’t like the idea but he had no choice. He had to abandon Manila so thus began the withdrawal as lines of trucks and troops moved along the dust covered roads leading to Bataan.

General MacArthur together with President Manuel L. Quezon would later retreat on Christmas Eve to the rock fortress of Corregidor, an island at the entrance of Manila Bay where he would direct his troops. It was a moon-lit balmy evening but Manila was dark and quiet when MacArthur and Quezon sneaked out and headed for the safety compound of Corregidor. It was not a safe haven, they found out later on.

Benjamin and his group walked at a steady pace for another two days. As they were nearing Tarlac, they were hearing explosions close by. There were more explosions it seemed. Looking further out, they could see clouds of black smoke billowing up in the sky, then more explosions. Every so often, they would stop on their trek and waited till the explosion stopped. It just went on forever, it seemed. It could not possibly be too far because it sounded too loud. They were getting very nervous. They knew heavy fighting must be going on somewhere nearby. They could smell the gunpowder. They were hoping they would not encounter the enemy on the road. The road was very busy at certain sections but they had not seen any Japanese troops. They were mostly American soldiers and Filipino soldiers going the other way. At around 4 PM, they hastened their pace before it really got dark. They were determined to reach the provincial capital of Tarlac.

The name Tarlac derived from a tough weed called tanlac or tarlac growing in the wilderness north of San Fernando. Tarlac was founded in 1686 and in 1860, the Spaniards made Tarlac a constabulary zone to protect the settlers from the mountain tribes. However in 1896, Tarlac was one of the eight provinces that revolted against the Spaniards. In October of 1899, General Emilio Aguinaldo, the president of the revolutionary government transferred the seat of government to Tarlac. A year and four months later, the United States took over the province and established a civil government there.

When Benjamin and his group arrived in Tarlac, there had been heavy fighting there for at least two days. That explained the explosions they were hearing before. Over 700 American, Philippine and Japanese soldiers died in that battle.

They were looking for the municipal building where they usually stayed for the night when they heard the roar of army trucks and a band of Japanese soldiers approaching in their direction. There was no time to run away or hide from them. They knew the Japanese soldiers saw them. If they ran, chances were the Japanese would fire their guns. Better to stay calm. Still, there was that fear that they could get shot. Some of the Japanese soldiers got off the trucks and with their bayonet-tipped rifles brandishing away waved at Benjamin and his group and told them to stop.

“Stop.”  Benjamin heard them say.

‘BAHALA NA (Come What May)” is available at http://www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan, http://www.amazon.co.uk in paperback and Kindle.

Did you think your 9-yr old grandchildren would read a WWII novel?

It never occurred to me that my 9-yr old grandchildren would read my historical novel “Bahala Na (Come What May). But surprisingly they did and love it.

I sent a copy of my book (BAHALA NA – Come What May) to my stepdaughter in Connecticut who have three kids: twin girls aged 9 and their sister, aged 11. My stepgrandchildren love reading and they are well ahead of their class in reading. A day after my daughter got the book, she decided to start reading it but she could not find the book where she placed it. She looked all over the house. She then saw one of the twins in the living room, engrossed in reading the book. My granddaughter refused to give it up and carried the book to school. She read the book whenever she could. Her teacher saw her reading it and was shocked to see her reading a historical novel and told her she could not read it. She held the book up and pointed to the author proudly. “My grandma wrote this book and it is very good!” The teacher was dumbfounded. She did not know what to say.

My granddaughter talked to me on the phone and announced, “Grandma, your book is really good.” I was thrilled to hear that and suddenly thought if there was anything in the book that a 9-yr old should not read. Luckily there was none that I could think of. There are lots of educational stuffs that could be very interesting for someone who is thirsting for knowledge. When she finished the book, her older sister read it, then their mother did and now my youngest granddaughter, the younger of the twin is in the middle of reading it. They came to visit this week and she showed me where she was at the book. My grandchildren wants to know when they can visit the Philippines and see all the places mentioned in the book.  

BAHALA NA (Come What May) is written with everyone in mine, young or old. History, romance, legend, travelogue, action and suspense filled the pages. It’s a book for someone who loves to learn something, someone who thirsts for knowledge. I wrote the book with a goal to educate, to teach something. The book is based on historical facts – historical knowledge that seemed to be lacking in people’s mind nowadays. It is an excellent educational tool and I highly recommend it to be included in the school curriculum in history for both American and Filipino students.

Filipinos are a growing population here and abroad. There is so much to know about the Filipino people. If you want to learn about the Filipinos and what make them tick, read BAHALA NA (Come What May). GET YOUR COPY NOW! It is available at www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan in paperback and Kindle. 


 

PHILIPPINE INDEPENDENCE DAY SALE – From June 5, 2013 until July 4, 2013.

Filipinos now celebrate their Independence Day on June 12, the day they got their independence from the colonial rule of Spain in 1898. When I was growing up, we celebrated Independence Day on July 4, the day the United States granted independence to the Philippines in 1946.

To honor both dates, I’m offering a month long reduced price for a signed copy of “BAHALA NA (Come What May)”, a WWII novel for a special price of $16.95 with free shipping.  Please send your name and address together with a check for $16.95 payable to Rosalinda Morgan and mail to Rosalinda Morgan, 3056 Sugarberry Ln., Johns Island, SC 29455.  Envelope has to be postmarked between June 5 and July 4, 2013.

“Bahala Na (Come What May)” is a fresh look at the traditions and social mores of the Philippines just before and during World War II. It is a gripping tale of a Filipino couple coping with the vicissitude of life during the war until they gained their independence from the United States on July 4, 1946. It describes some events that were never written before and are part of the Philippine history that we should know about.

Memorial Day Remembrance

Memorial Day has and always should be a day when we all take a moment to remember and honor our veterans who made the ultimate sacrifice in times of war to protect our freedom.  Freedom is not free.  Because of these veterans, our families are free today.  On this Memorial Day, and every day, may each and every one of these brave men and women who served and protected our country know that we are all eternally grateful for their supreme sacrifice.

On May 5, 1986, Waterloo, NY held the first formal, village-wide observance of a day devoted to honoring U.S. war dead.  Memorial Day, originated in a ceremony called Decoration Day, was originally observed as a memorial by the northern states to the Union soldiers who died in the Civil War.  Memorial came into being when John Logan, Union Army General and Commander in Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order No. 11 fixing May 30 as the annual date “for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in the defense of their country in the late rebellion.  It then grew into a national holiday that honors soldiers killed in all wars.  In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed a proclamation designating Waterloo, NY the birthplace of Memorial Day.

May 30th was initially designated as Memorial Day but an Act of Congress moved Memorial Day to the last Monday in May, which only served to take away from its intended purpose as a day to remember our war dead.  Memorial Day became a federal holiday in 1971 and has been an annual tribute to those who have given their lives in service to their country.

Local towns and villages pay homage to America’s fallen veterans, survivors and servicemen and women over Memorial Day weekend with parades, concerts, speeches, memorial services and wreath-laying ceremonies.

On this Memorial Day, and every day, may each and every one of these brave men and women who served and protected our country know that we are all eternally grateful for their supreme sacrifice. 

SPECIAL OFFER FOR MEMORIAL DAY (expires May 31, 2013) – “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” – a WWII novel dedicated to WWII veterans.

http://wp.me/p2VA3G-46.

 

 

Honor your mother on Mother’s Day – Sunday, May 12, 2013

Anna Reeves Jarvis was the first woman to hold a celebration of mothers in 1858 in West Virginia, where she instituted Mothers’ Work Day to raise awareness about local sanitation issues.  During the Civil War, she expanded the scope of Mothers’ Work Day to include sanitary conditions on both sides of the battlefield.

Julia Ward Howe, author of the “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” also attempted to institute a national celebration of mothers that honored women’s inclinations toward peace.  In 1872 she initiated and promoted a Mother’s Day for Peace, to be held on June 2, which was celebrated the following year by women in 18 cities across America.  The holiday continued for another decade but eventually phased out after Howe stopped underwriting the cost of the celebrations.

In 1905, Anna Reeves Jarvis passed away and her daughter, Anna Jarvis, took up her mother’s cause.  Anna swore on her mother’s gravesite that she would continue her mother’s lifelong dream of creating a national day to honor mothers.  In 1907, Anna launched her campaign by handing out white carnations to the parishioners at her mother’s church in Grafton, West Virginia.

Mother’s Day was first celebrated in 1908, when Anna Jarvis’ church acquiesced to Anna’s request to hold a special Sunday service in honor of mothers – a tradition that spread the very next year to churches in 46 states.  In 1909, Anna left her job and began a campaign to make “Mother’s Day” a recognized holiday in the United States.  She dedicated herself to a full-time letter-writing campaign, asking politicians, clergymen and civic leaders to institute a national day for mothers.  Jarvis’ efforts met with success and her home state of West Virginia adopted an official Mother’s Day.  Two years later, the U.S. Congress passed a Joint Resolution, signed by President Wilson, establishing a national Mother’s Day emphasizing the role of women in their families.

In 1912, Anna Jarvis trademarked the phrases “second Sunday in May” and “Mother’s Day” in the singular possessive form in honor of each mother.  Mother’s Day has been celebrated by Americans on the second Sunday in May ever since.

Jarvis holiday was adopted by other countries and cultures and it is now celebrated all over the world.  The date was changed to fit already existing celebrations honoring motherhood, such as Mothering Sunday in the United Kingdom and the Orthodox celebration of the presentation of Jesus Christ to the temple on February 2 in Greece.

Ironically, Anna Jarvis never had children of her own.  But that didnt stop her from making the celebration of Mother’s Day her lifelong mission.  In fact, as the holiday took on a life of its own, Jarvis expressed disappointment over its growing commercialization by the 1920s.  In this tradition, each person offers a gift, card, or remembrance toward their mothers, grandmothers and/or maternal figure on Mother’s Day.  For my part, I dedicate my book “BAHALA NA (Come What May): A World War II Story of Love, Faith, Courage, Determination and Survival” to my mother as shown in the Dedication Page.

Rosalinda Morgan

www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan