Memorial Day Weekend 2020

This year, Memorial Day is different from years past. Not just because of the Coronavirus. This is the first time, I spend Memorial Day weekend without Matt since we got married 50 years ago on Memorial Day Weekend. I miss the times we walked to the corner of our street in Oyster Bay to see the parade. It’s not the same anymore and never will be the same again.

 

Matt on his ship
Matthew Morgan on his ship, USS Fiske.

I found this photo of Matt in one of the boxes in his closet while cleaning up his things. I always wonder why I have not seen any picture of him in uniform. Well, I finally found one. He served in WWII with the U.S. Navy.

 

Taps” is a bugle call played at dusk, during flag ceremonies, and at military funerals by the United States Armed Forces. … The tune is also sometimes known as “Butterfield’s Lullaby”, or by the first line of the lyric, “Day Is Done”.

 

Lest we forget. . . Remember the men in uniform who fought so we can have the freedom we enjoy today.

 

Happy Memorial Day!

MEMORIAL DAY – A DAY OF REMEMBRANCE

Memorial Day Image 

 

 

Lest we forget, Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s wars.

Established in the 1860s during the American Civil War, Memorial Day tapped into the general human need to honor our dead who have done so much to serve this great country.

Memorial Day originated in a ceremony called Decoration Day in 1868 was originally observed as a memorial by the northern states to the Union soldiers who died in the Civil War.  Memorial Day became a federal holiday in 1971 and has been an annual tribute to those who have given their lives in service to their country.  May 30th was initially designated as Memorial Day but an Act of Congress moved Memorial Day to the last Monday in May which this year is May 29.

The day has and always should be a day when we all take a moment to honor and reflect upon these men and women of the armed forces who have made the supreme sacrifice in times of wars to protect our freedom.  They perished in service to their country and for each and every man, woman, and child who calls the United States home.   

Happy Memorial Day and remember.

Happy Memorial Day and remember . . .

Lest we forget, Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those men and women of the armed forces who have made the supreme sacrifice in times of war.  

Memorial Day Parade

The occasion of Memorial Day will be marked by parades, speeches and wreath-laying ceremonies.  People are urged to take time from their day’s activities on Memorial Day to remember those who died in the service of their country. For those who have lost a loved one in the service of our country, the day will be an especially poignant one.

Established in the 1860s during the American Civil War, Memorial Day tapped into the general human need to honor our dead who have done so much to serve this great country. Memorial Day came into being in a ceremony called Decoration Day in 1868 when John Logan, Commander in Chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, issued an  order fixing May 30, “for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in the defense of their country in the late rebellion.” Memorial Day was originally observed as a memorial by the northern states to the Union soldiers who died in the Civil War.  From this, Memorial Day, or Decoration Day, as it also came to be called, grew into a national holiday that honors soldiers killed in all wars. 

Memorial Day became a federal holiday in 1971 and has been an annual tribute to those who have given their lives in service to their country. May 30th was initially designated as Memorial Day but an Act of Congress moved Memorial Day to the last Monday in May which only served to take away from its intended purpose as a day to remember our war dead. 

The day has and always should be a day when we all ,take a moment to honor and reflect upon these men and women of the armed forces who have made the supreme sacrifice in times of wars to protect our freedom. They perished in service to their country and for each and every man, woman, and child who calls the United States home.

My gratitude to all men and women in uniform who served and who are still serving in our armed forces – From Rosalinda R Morgan, author of “BAHALA NA (Come What May): A WWII Story of Faith, Love, Courage, Determination and Survival”, a book dedicated to our soldiers.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

Author and Garden Writer

Red Poppies in Memory of Veterans

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Every year around Memorial Day, you see volunteers of the American Legion Auxiliary distributing bright red crepe paper poppies made by hospitalized veterans in exchange for contributions which help both disabled and hospitalized veterans.  The program provides multiple benefits to veterans and the community. Donations are used exclusively to assist and support veterans and their families and the poppy also reminds the community of the continuing needs of veterans.  The veterans who make the poppies earn a small wage and there are many therapeutic benefits, both mental and physical, associated with the activity.

The legend of the poppy began during World War I when a Lt. Col. John McCrea, a doctor and a member of the Canadian army, wrote a beautiful poem called, In Flanders Fields, which has become one of the most famous war poems honoring those who made the ultimate sacrifice.  The Poppy’s worldwide symbol of sacrifice is worn to honor the men and women who served and dies for their country in all wars, including the Global War on Terrorism.  The Poppy grew wild on the battlefields of Flanders Fields and has become a symbol of sacrifice endured by the soldiers.  Like the blood that was shed there, its brilliant red bloom became a symbol of hope and renewal for those who lived and walked away.  For those who would never leave, it became a perpetual memory to their bravery.  So please look for the volunteer with the tray of poppies and support the veterans.

 

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders Fields the Poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders Fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe;

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though Poppies grow

in Flanders Fields.

By Lt. Col. John McCrea (1872-1918)

 

Like The Star Spangled Banner, written in Baltimore Harbor during the bombardment, In Flanders Fields was written on the spot, as Canadian battle surgeon, John McCrae gazed at fresh graves of his friends and comrades, and poppies “blowing” in the wind. Obviously, the post-war, blood red bloom from the fields of battle had a huge impact on all who saw or heard about it and has been a lasting memorial.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

Author and Garden Writer

Author of BAHALA NA (Come What May) – A WWII Story of Love, Faith, Courage, Determination and Survival

HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY

Happy Memorial Day and remember . . .

Lest we forget, Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s wars.

Established in the 1860s during the American Civil War, Memorial Day tapped into the general human need to honor our dead who have done so much to serve this great country.

Memorial Day originated in a ceremony called Decoration Day in 1868 was originally observed as a memorial by the northern states to the Union soldiers who died in the Civil War. Memorial Day became a federal holiday in 1971 and has been an annual tribute to those who have given their lives in service to their country. May 30th was initially designated as Memorial Day but an Act of Congress moved Memorial Day to the last Monday in May.

The day has and always should be a day when we all take a moment to honor and reflect upon these men and women of the armed forces who have made the supreme sacrifice in times of wars to protect our freedom. They perished in service to their country and for each and every man, woman, and child who calls the United States home.

My gratitude to all men and women in uniform who served and who are still serving in our armed forces – From Rosalinda R Morgan, author of “BAHALA NA (Come What May): A WWII Story of Faith, Love, Courage, Determination and Survival”, a book dedicated to our soldiers.