TEN MORE WORDS TO IMPROVE YOUR VOCABULARY

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As I catch up on my 2017 reading challenge, I am still aware of how many new words I come across in all the books that I read. I’m not a speed reader. I read every word and when new word appears that I don’t know, Mr. Webster comes in handy all the time. Since English is not my native language, I want to learn as many new words as I can.

I try to enlarge my vocabulary so I don’t get into the trap of using “You know” like most people do. I am always tempted to tell them I really don’t know. I can’t stand people who keeps on saying “You know” or worst yet, using the F word. It just shows how limited their vocabulary is.

Here are this month’s words, so you can impress your friends and colleagues, and maybe even fatten your wallet!

1.       Pell mell – adverb – in mingled confusion or disorder

2.      Daguerreotype – noun – an early photograph produced on a silver or silver-covered copper plate

3.      Doppelgänger – noun – a ghostly counterpart of a living person

4.      Palaver – verb – to talk profusely or idle; noun – idle talk

5.      Flibbertigibbet – noun – a silly flighty person

6.      Effete – adjective – effeminate

7.      Protuberant – adjective – thrusting out from a surrounding or adjacent surface often as a rounded mass

8.     Extrapolate – verb – to project, extend or expand (known data or experiment) into an area not known or experienced so as to arrive at a conjectural knowledge of the unknown area.

9.      Divertissement – noun – diversion

10.   Cartellino – noun – Italian for small piece of parchment or paper painted illusionistically, often as though attached to a wall or parapet in a painting, commonly with the artist’s name or that of a sitter; price tag or price label.

 

Have you encountered a new word this month  that you don’t know? Share it on the comments section.

 

Until Next time. Keep on reading.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

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TEN WORDS TO IMPROVE YOUR VOCABULARY THIS MONTH

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English is not my native language but I am curious enough to learn a new word all the time. When I read a book and come upon a new word, I have a habit of checking it in my Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary. I have been doing this since I was in high school. It’s a great way to enlarge your vocabulary.

Do you know that studies have shown that your income and wealth are directly related to the size and depth of your vocabulary? I’m still working on this and working hard at it I must say.

Here are this month’s words, so you can impress your friends and colleagues, and maybe even fatten your wallet!

 

1.       abatis – (noun) – a defensive obstacle formed by felled trees with sharpened branches facing the enemy

2.      cockade – (noun) – an ornament (as a rosette) worn on the hat as a badge

3.      comestible – (noun) – food usually used in plural.

4.      corduroyed – (verb) – to build a road of logs laid side by side transversely

5.      espiègle – (adjective) – frolicsome, roguish

6.      feint – (noun) – a mock blow or attack on or toward one part in order to distract attention from the point one really intends to attack

7.      integument – (noun) – something that covers or encloses

8.     meerschaum – (noun) – a tobacco pipe of a fine light clayey mineral that is a hydrous magnesium silicate found chiefly in Asia Minor.

9.      orgulous – (adjective) – meaning proud, haughty

10.  suppurate – (verb) – to form or discharge pus

 

Have you encountered a new word this month? Share it on the comments section.

 

Until Next time. Keep on reading.

Rosalinda R Morgan

Author & Garden Writer

Do you know what a Palindrome is?

Do you know what a Palindrome is? I didn’t know it either until . . .

I became aware of this word when I read Russel Ray’s blog at activerain.com when I was selling real estate in New York and he hit a palindrome.

After I posted my blog that evening, I just noticed my points.   I had never seen a  palindrome on my points before that.   That was incredible.

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Palindrome, according to Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary, is a word, verse or sentence that reads the same backward or forward.

Here are some examples of palindrome.

Name – ABBA

Number – 247742

Sentence – Able was I ere I saw Elba.

How many palindromes can you come up with? Post them here under comments.