How many red roses do you have in your garden?

Today is National Red Rose Day. A red rose conjures of romantic love, passion, respect and courage. In celebration of the National Red Rose Day, I’m listing the red roses in my garden. I have 21 red roses, 17 varieties.

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1.       1 Mister Lincoln – dark red – Hybrid Tea

2.      2 Veterans’ Honor – dark red – Hybrid Tea

3.      1 Firefighter – dark red – Hybrid Tea

4.      1 Ingrid Bergman – dark red – Hybrid Tea

5.      1 Drop Dead Red – dark red – Floribunda

6.      1 Let Freedom Ring – medium red – Hybrid Tea

7.      2 Dublin Bay – medium red – Climber

8.     1 Miracle on the Hudson – medium red -Shrub

9.      1 Oso Easy Cherry Pie – medium red – Shrub

10.  1 Othello – medium red – Shrub

11.   1 Grande Amore – medium red – Hybrid Tea

12.  1 Cramoisi Superieur – medium red – China

13.  1 Louis Philippe – red blend – China

14.  1 Fourth of July – red blend – Climber

15.  2 Scentimental – red blend – Floribunda

16.  2 Rock & Roll – red blend – Grandiflora

17.   1 Dick Clark – red blend – Grandiflora

 

Here is a poem by Robert Burns (1759-1796) titled

A RED. RED ROSE

 O, my Luve’s like a red, red rose,

That’s newly sprung in June.

O, my Luve’s like a melodie

That’ sweetly play’d in tune.

 

As fair as thou, my bonnie lass,

So deep in love am I;

And I will love thee still, my dear,

Till a’ the seas gang dry.

 

Till a’ the seas gang dry, my dear,

And the rocks melt wi’ the sun:

I will love thee still, my dear,

Thile the sands o’ life shall run:

 

And fare thee well, my only luve!

And fare thee weel a while!

And I will come again, my luve,

Tho’ it ware ten thousand mile.

 

 

Happy National Red Rose Day!

Until Next time. Stop and Smell the Roses

Rosalinda R Morgan

 

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Red Poppies in Memory of Veterans

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Every year around Memorial Day, you see volunteers of the American Legion Auxiliary distributing bright red crepe paper poppies made by hospitalized veterans in exchange for contributions which help both disabled and hospitalized veterans.  The program provides multiple benefits to veterans and the community. Donations are used exclusively to assist and support veterans and their families and the poppy also reminds the community of the continuing needs of veterans.  The veterans who make the poppies earn a small wage and there are many therapeutic benefits, both mental and physical, associated with the activity.

The legend of the poppy began during World War I when a Lt. Col. John McCrea, a doctor and a member of the Canadian army, wrote a beautiful poem called, In Flanders Fields, which has become one of the most famous war poems honoring those who made the ultimate sacrifice.  The Poppy’s worldwide symbol of sacrifice is worn to honor the men and women who served and dies for their country in all wars, including the Global War on Terrorism.  The Poppy grew wild on the battlefields of Flanders Fields and has become a symbol of sacrifice endured by the soldiers.  Like the blood that was shed there, its brilliant red bloom became a symbol of hope and renewal for those who lived and walked away.  For those who would never leave, it became a perpetual memory to their bravery.  So please look for the volunteer with the tray of poppies and support the veterans.

 

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders Fields the Poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders Fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe;

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though Poppies grow

in Flanders Fields.

By Lt. Col. John McCrea (1872-1918)

 

Like The Star Spangled Banner, written in Baltimore Harbor during the bombardment, In Flanders Fields was written on the spot, as Canadian battle surgeon, John McCrae gazed at fresh graves of his friends and comrades, and poppies “blowing” in the wind. Obviously, the post-war, blood red bloom from the fields of battle had a huge impact on all who saw or heard about it and has been a lasting memorial.

 

Rosalinda Morgan

Author and Garden Writer

Author of BAHALA NA (Come What May) – A WWII Story of Love, Faith, Courage, Determination and Survival

GETTING READY FOR CHRISTMAS? HERE IS A CHRISTMAS INSPIRATION FOR US ALL.

 

With all that are happening around the world, here is something to think about this Christmas season. I prefer “Christmas season” instead of “holiday season”. After all, this poem is titled “Christmas Bells” written by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, long before the country has gone crazy with “politically correctness”.

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CHRISTMAS BELLS

I heard the bells on Christmas Day

Their old, familiar carols play,

And wild and sweet

The words repeat

Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

 

And thought how, as the day had come,

The belfries of all Christendom

Had rolled along

The unbroken song

Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

 

Till, ringing, singing on its way,

The world revolved from night to day,

A voice, a chime,

A chant sublime

Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

 

Then from each black, accursed mouth

The cannon thundered in the South,

And with the sound

The carols drowned

Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

 

And in despair I bowed my head;

“There is no peace on earth,” I said;

“For hate is strong,

And mocks the song

Of peace on earth, good-will to men!”

 

Then pealed the bells more loud and deep:

“God is not dead; nor doth he sleep!

The Wrong shall fail,

The Right prevail,

With peace on earth, good-will to men!”

 

By Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

 

Until next time, stop and smell the roses.

Rosalinda

 

Rosalinda Morgan 

Author and Garden Writer

The Iron Butterfly

BAHALA NA (Come What May)

Get your copy today at www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan.