KINDLE COUNTDOWN DEAL CONTINUES

Here’s is a chance for you to know about the Filipino people. Read “BAHALA NA (Come What May), a historical fiction about WWII in the Philippines and how the Filipinos keep their faith to sustain them in times of trouble. “Bahala na!” “Leave it to God!”

Kindle Countdown Deals for “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” continues.

Today, Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013, you can buy your Kindle copy of my book, “BAHALA NA  (Come What May)” at a discount price of $1.99. A good deal.

Tomorrow, Thursday, Nov. 28, the price will go up to $2.99.

On Friday, Nov. 29, the price will reach to $3.99, still a dollar off the regular price.

On Saturday, Nov. 30, the price will go back to the regular price of $4.99.

Take advantage of the discounted price at www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan. Buy the Kindle copy of “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” TODAY.

BAHALA NA – KINDLE COUNTDOWN DEALS

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Kindle Countdown Deals for BAHALA NA (COME WHAT MAY) is set to begin today, November 26, 2013 at 8:00:00 AM PST.

You can buy your Kindle copy of my book, “Bahala Na (Come What May)” at a discount price of $.99 today,Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013. The best deal!

Tomorrow, Wednesday, Nov. 27, the price goes up to $1.99.

On Thursday, Nov. 28, the price will be $2.99.

On Friday, Nov. 29, the price goes up to $3.99, still a dollar off the regular price.

On Saturday, Nov. 30, the price goes back to the regular price of $4.99.

Take advantage of the discounted price at www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan.

Learn about the Philippines and the Filipino people and how their faith helps them in their struggle through life. “Bahala Na”, “Leave it to God” is their motto when they are in trouble.

Rosalinda Morgan,author

“BAHALA NA (Come What May)”.

 

BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF AND THE KAMIKAZE

After landing in Leyte on Oct. 20, 1944, General Douglas MacArthur’s troops started the drive to retake the Philippine Islands. When Gen. MacArthur returned, the guerillas were in good number. Some Filipinos went underground and joined the guerilla movement. Some joined the American troops.

A few days after the landing, one of the greatest naval battles in history began on October 23, 1944 when 64 Japanese warships engaged 216 American warships in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Fighting took place simultaneously in three areas: off Cape Engaño, off Samar, and in the Surigao Strait (south of Samar). This three-day battle, Oct. 23-25, 1944 marked the last use of battle-line formation, in which giant battleships faced and fired on each other at point-blank range.

The first and coordinated kamikaze suicide units were used by the Japanese forces on Oct. 25, 1944. Out of desperation, the Japanese pilots employed kamikaze tactics – the suicidal method of dive-bombing their enemies at the Battle at Leyte Gulf. Hoping to win the war in their favor, the Japanese planned to blow away the Allied Forces by loading planes with bombs and extra gasoline. The kamikaze planes were flown deliberately to crash into their targets. Inspite of the kamikaze tactics, the Japanese fleet was decimated at the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Kamikaze means “divine wind”. The word was used for the new Japanese suicide pilots of World War II. It recalled the legend of Ise, the wind god who had saved Japan from an enemy invasion in ancient times. This legend was based on an event that happened on Aug. 14 and 15, 1281 when Japan was saved by a famous typhoon that blew away a Sino-Mongol invasion of 3,500 ships with more than 100,000 warriors under the command of the great Kublai Khan of China to invade Japan.

 

 

Oct. 20, 1944 – Gen. Douglas MacArthur returned to the Philippines

When General Douglas MacArthur left the Philippines in March 1942, he promised “I shall return”. It was 69 years ago today that he made good his promise by returning with an invasion force. The landing, which took place at four spots along a 30-km stretch of coastline on Leyte, involved 700 vessels and 174,000 U.S. servicemen. On October 20, 1944, MacArthur landed in Leyte, fulfilling his promise to the Filipino people by wading ashore at Leyte, but the evening before the Leyte landing, MacArthur spoke through a radio transmitter announcing. . .

“People of the Philippines, I have returned. By the grace of Almighty God, our forces stand again on Philippine soil… Rally to me! Let the indomitable spirit of Bataan and Corregidor lead… The guidance of divine God points the way. Follow in His name to the Holy Grail of righteous victory!”

Gen. MacArthur, wearing his field marshal’s cap, sunglasses and freshly pressed khakis wanted to land on the beach but ran aground in the shallows while still 100 yards from the beach. The commander of the craft could not bring the landing craft in any closer and so an irritated MacArthur accompanied by President Osmeña and their staffs had to wade ashore. It became one of the most famous images of World War II. Upon seeing the newsreels of his landing, MacArthur was so stirred by the picture that he ordered his staffs to arrange for all subsequent island landings to begin offshore so he could walk through knee-deep water onto the beach.

In honor of Gen. MacArthur’s return, I’m giving a FREE DOWNLOAD of “BAHALA NA (Come What May) at Kindle Lending Library on Oct. 20.

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of “BAHALA NA (Come What May”.

All rights reserved. Oct. 20, 1944 – Gen. Douglas MacArthur returned to the Philippines

BAUAN CATHEDRAL IN BAUAN, BATANGAS

During the Spanish regime, the Spaniards tried to Christianize the Filipinos and they built great churches during their more than three hundred years regime in thePhilippines. The church in Bauan, Batangas has a long history.

The first church of Bauan was not located at the present site. Since the Mission of Bauan was a visita of Taal, the first church was built along the southern shores of Taal Lake in a place called Tambo. Bauan Parish was founded on May 17, 1590 as Luman Bauang and became an independent parish on May 12, 1596.

Since its foundation, the Bauan Parish has been relocated three times. To escape the violent eruptions of Taal Volcano, another church was built in 1667 by Fr. Jose Rodriguez in a place called Durungao, then relocated later to Loual in 1671 by Fr. Nicolas de Rivera. Another church was built in 1692 near the sea during the administration of Fr. Simon Martinez but was damaged during the typhoon of 1694. It was rebuilt from 1695 to 1697 by Fr. Ignacio Mercado. The church was damaged again. Fr. Blas Vidal built a stone structure from 1700 to 1710.

 Fr. Jose Victoria started building the present church in 1762 and construction continued for years. Fr. Jose Trevino added the convent in 1762 and also the magnificent, hexagonal domed bell tower in 1772. Fr. Alberto Tabores installed a huge bell in the tower in 1788. The present church was built in 1848 by Fr. Manuel del Arco who put the stone fence of the atrium with wrought iron columns. The tower and the choir loft were destroyed in 1870 and were repaired in 1874 and a clock was also installed. Its façade was completed by Fr. Hipolito Huerta who also worked on the transept and was completed by Fr. Felipe Bravo in 1881. Final decorations were applied starting in 1881 under the direction of Fr. Moises Santos and continued until 1894 under Fr. Felipe Garcia.  The Bauan Cathedral was the most artistically built church in Batangas at that time. However, the church burned down during the Philippine revolution against Spain in 1898 and then completely rebuilt. However, it was destroyed by fire again in 1938. Then it was restored again.

The church houses the Holy Cross of Bauan, the patron saint of the town. The cross was found in 1595 by local natives in a place called Dingin, near Alitagtag and installed later in Bauan Cathedral.

 

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In the book “BAHALA NA (Come What May)”, this is the place where Benjamin and Adelaide were married in 1943.

 

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This is the back where the Japanese stored all the cotton harvested by the townspeople and later shipped to Japan. Sources said that the Japanese built a tunnel from the church to nearby towns.

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This is the convent and the school attached to the church mentioned in the “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” where Adelaide and her sister used to help the nuns.

 

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of “BAHALA NA (Come What May”.

All rights reserved. BAUAN CATHEDRAL IN BAUAN BATANGAS

BAHALA NA (Come What May) FREE Download at KINDLE LENDING LIBRARY on 9-29-2013

ImageTo honor the Gold Star Mothers and in observance of the Gold Star Mother’s Day on Sunday, Sept. 29, you can download FREE “BAHALA NA (Come What May): A WWII Story of Faith, Love, Courage, Determination and Survival” on 9/29/13 at Kindle Lending Library starting at approximately 12 AM Pacific Standard Time to approximately 11:59 PM Pacific Standard Time.

When World War II starts, Benjamin is caught in a place 465 kilometers away from home as the Japanese are landing everywhere. How will he get home? What happens if he encounters the Japanese on the way? Will he see his family again? How about the girl he cares deeply? These are questions looming in his head as he starts his long journey back home.

“Bahala Na (Come What May)” is a fresh look at the traditions and social mores of the era just before and during World War II. It also describes eyewitness accounts of World War II events that were never written before.  “Bahala Na (Come What May)” is a WWII novel, full of human drama, suspense and action and dedicated to WWII veterans.

Please leave a review at http://www.amazon.com/author/rosalindarmorgan after you finish reading the book. Thank you.

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. BAHALA NA (Come What May) FREE Download at KINDLE LENDING LIBRARY on 9-29-2013.

BAHALA NA (Come What May) FREE Download at KINDLE on 9-11-2013

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To honor the spirit of the men and women whose lives were lost in New York, at the Pentagon, and at a field in Shade Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, you can download “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” FREE on 9/11/13 only at Kindle Lending Library starting at  approximately 12 AM Pacific Standard Time to approximately 11:59 PM Pacific Standard Time.

 

“Bahala Na (Come What May)” is a fresh look at the traditions and social mores of the era just before and during World War II. It also describes eyewitness accounts of World War II events that were never written before.  “Bahala Na (Come What May)” is a WWII novel dedicated to WWII veterans, full of human drama, suspense and action.

 

When World War II starts, Benjamin is caught in a place 465 kilometers away from home as the Japanese are landing everywhere. How will he get home? What happens if he encounters the Japanese on the way? Will he see his family again? How about the girl he cares deeply? These are questions looming in his head as he starts his long journey back home.

 

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. BAHALA NA (Come What May) FREE DOWNLOAD AT KINDLE LENDING LIBRARY on 9-11-2013 .

What motivated you to become an indie author?

When I started, I had no idea what publishing a book entailed. So I began reading about it when I was almost finished writing my manuscript. Then I sent out a letter to a publisher, thinking it was the same as sending an application letter to a company. I worked in a corporate world before and I had written enough job application letters during my business career. Then the more I read about publishing, the more I found out you need a literary agent. I suppose just like selling your home, you need a real estate agent. I can’t argue with that. I was also a real estate agent before.

I read Chuck Sambuchino’s book on Formatting and Submitting your Manuscript and started studying it thoroughly and then started working on my manuscript format and all kinds of things. I sent a query to a literary agent just before Labor Day in 2012. I waited a month but never heard from him. Since it was going into the holidays, I decided to postpone sending queries till the beginning of 2013 and instead started rewriting, editing, and polishing my manuscript. I sent an email query in January and got my first rejection letter. Then I filled up a blank form on a website for another agent. I never heard from her. I found an agent dealing with WWII subject, sent her my query and got a rejection letter within the hour. She could not do anything either.

I was not to be defeated. I started reading about self publishing. That was when I realized I didn’t have to wait years and years to get published. The publishing world is changing. As a former accountant, I analyzed the numbers and the numbers don’t lie. I decided to self-publish. Besides getting more royalty on self publishing, I’m not waiting for twenty years to be published. I don’t have that luxury of time. I’ll be dead by then. I’m 69. I want my book published now before my mother died. She’s 90 and “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” is based on her story. Formatting a manuscript for publication took a lot out of me but I learned a lot and enjoyed the journey. Rewrite, edit, rewrite, edit, rewrite, edit for few more times until I thought it was done. I felt like I was doing my garden. It was constantly changing but the experience was exhilarating seeing my name on the cover of a finished book and I made it to happen. It was all my effort. I created a beautiful book and I did it from start to finish. I sent a copy of “BAHALA NA (Come What May)” to my mother whose story the book was based on. When my mother read the book, she was thrilled and told me she could not help smile seeing her life story in print, I felt it was my best reward. But wait, she said I missed a few things. I guess I have to do a revision someday.

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. What motivated you to become an indie author?

What is the meaning of BAHALA NA?

When we were editing my book, “BAHALA NA (Come What May)”, a phrase popped up few times and caught our attention. That was when we decided to change the title of the book and published it with the new title, “BAHALA NA (Come What May)”.

“Bahala na” is a philosophical expression Filipinos used when they are confronted with problems. They will say “Bahala Na”, meaning “come what may,” “whatever will be, will be,” ‘leave it to God’, like the Spanish word “que sera, sera”.  

“Bahala na”,comes from the phrase Bathala na, where Bathala means God. Bahala also means trust or custody. Na is used as an adverb of time just like already. So it can literally be translated as God already or God will take care already. It is used in the context of “Trust in God”, “God will take control”,“Leave it to God” because God will provide. In a sense, it can be construed as a negative attitude in life, a defeatist or fatalistic attitude where you are only willing to do so much and leave the rest to God. Some people believe it makes you irresponsible, careless and lazy. On the other hand, it stops you from worrying about your problem during uncertain times. It relieves stress knowing you did everything you could and God will take control of the rest.

When faced with challenging situations, Filipinos can do a daring act and they leave everything to God hoping God will take care of them. They accept what comes their way, appreciate what they have, and God will take care of the rest. In time of tragedy, they are not easily discouraged. They know they have done their best and with a strong faith, they leave everything to God, knowing God is on their side. True, the term signifies an attitude intended to surrender to fate which can be construed as a negative attitude but it enables them to take a chance and accept what fate has to offer. It can also be viewed as a positive thinking, in the sense that it gives them strength and confidence to tackle any job head on in the hope that everything will turn out for the best if God wills it.  

“Bahala na” is used in different ways such as:

  • Bahala na come what may
  • Akong bahala sa ‘yo.I’ll take care of you
  • Bahalawhatever
  • Bahala ka na – it’s up to you
  • Bahala ka na ngait’s up to you
  • Bahala na ang Diosit’s up to God
  • Bahala na kayoit’s up to you or the decision is yours
  •  Bahala na silaleave it to them
  • Bahala ka na sa akin – you’ll take care of me
  • Bahala na sina nanay at nanay – it’s up to mom and dad
  • Bahala na kayong lahat – it’s up to all of you
  • Bahala na kong anong mangyari.he/she will accept whatever will happen
  • Ikaw ang bahala d’yan you’re in charge of that.
  • Ipabahalato leave the responsibility to someone else
  • mabahala to be concerned, to feel worried.
  • Palagi ka nalang bahala nayou are always saying come what may
  • magwalang-bahalato disregard
  • walang-bahalignorant,negligent
  • Nabahala ako sa narinig koI was distressed by what I heard

In Cebuano, a dialect of Cebu province, “Bahala Na”  is translated as mahitabo kung mahitabo; dili na mahinungdanon kung unsa pa may mahitabo o dangatan. I think I’ll stay with Bahala Na. It’s easier to remember.

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. What is the meaning of “BAHALA NA “?

Collaborate, Collaborator, Collaboration, Collaborationism

According to my 1983 Webster Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary , collaborate came from the word collaboratus (Late Latin), with a past participle of collaborare meaning to labor together, from Latin  com-+ laborare to labor. Collaborate means 1. to work jointly with others or together exp. in an intellectual endeavor. 2. to cooperate with or willingly assist an enemy of one’s country and esp. an occupying force. 3. to cooperate with an agency or instrumentality with which one is not immediately connected.  Collaborationism is the advocacy or practice of collaboration with an enemy.

The 1933 version of the Oxford English Dictionary listed only one definition for collaborate: “To work in conjunction with another or others, to co-operate; esp, in a literary or artistic production, or the like.” In those days, when one thought of collaboration, what came to mind was Gilbert and Sullivan. In the 1972 supplement of that dictionary, a second definition appeared – “To co-operate traitorously with the enemy”. The word had been used in that way since World War II.

The first definition both at Oxford English Dictionary and at Webster New Collegiate Dictionary is obviously inappropriate for books written about war in the Philippines. The other definitions are similar, but, a little different. The OED definition uses the word traitorously, and is rather restrictive. It refers only to those whose cooperation is traitorous; hence, it does not apply to those whose cooperation falls short of traitorous behavior. Webster’s definition is also restrictive in a different way. By using the words usu. willingly, Webster’s is making a judgment about attitude – a judgment that the OED does not appear to make. One can, after all, act traitorously but feel otherwise.

In my book, “BAHALA NA, (Come What May)”, I used the definition meaning simply to cooperate with the enemy.

Copyright © 2013. By Rosalinda R Morgan, author of BAHALA NA (Come What May.

All rights reserved. Collaborate, Collaborator, Collaboration, Collaborationism